Thursday, June 28, 2012

Set 447

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2593. Approximately 7" square:

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2594. 10" long:

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2595. This desk was used for a particular purpose:

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2596. 5-1/8 long, take a look at Neatorama for more guesses and a chance to win a T-shirt:

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2597. About 6" long, sent in by a visitor who is looking to identify this device, their description of it: "It looks like some sort of latching mechanism, currently in the latched position. When the lever is switched it looks like the rounded hole will line up with the two fixed ones."

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2598. Around 12" long:




















Answers:


2593. This is a "Tile Holding Tool for Use in Tile Cutting" specifically for when making a hole in tile, patent number 2,842,115:

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2594. This is a scribe for use when making a log cabin:

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2595. This desk was used in a post office in Virginia:

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2596. A chainsaw bumper spike, or dog bumper, the quote below on how it's used is from this site.

"Then place the bumper spikes near the engine firmly against the trunk, and start cutting. Pivot the saw about the bumper spikes and into the trunk, using a fanlike motion and moderate pressure to feed the chain into the wood. It is not necessary to move the saw in a sawing motion: the powered chain provides the cutting action. Pivot the saw, then move the bumper spikes to a new location and continue feeding the chain into the cut. Draw the saw out of the cut slowly and with the chain running. If you must cut without the bumper spikes in contact with the tree, or if the saw does not have spikes, be careful that the saw does not jerk and throw you offbalance when the chain contacts the bark or wood."

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The tool in this video is missing the saw but you can see where the spikes are mounted.




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2597. No luck yet on this device, the most suggested answer is that it's a latch for an old window or wagon from the 1800s.

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2598. This is an overhead trolley switch as seen in this photo from a trolley museum.














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Last week's set is seen below, click here to view the entire post.








More discussion and comments on these photos can be found at the newsgroup rec.puzzles.

7 comments:

  1. 2598 looks like a frog or common crossing of a feldbahn or mine railway system?
    B.

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  2. 2596 - ice climbing spikes

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  3. 2596- Part of a chainsaw- prevents the saw from slipping while bucking logs.

    2598 Agree with above: switch frog for some kind of small rail system.

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    1. Chainsaw part is correct for 2596

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  4. 2598 - Frog casting for overhead trolley wire.

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