Thursday, October 17, 2013

Set 515

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3001. 6" tall:






















3002. 3-1/2" long, sent in by a visitor:


























3003. Around 7' tall, take a look at Neatorama for more guesses and a chance to win a T-shirt.

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3004. 8" outside diameter, submitted by a visitor who would like to find the purpose of this piece of hardware:

























3005. Around 7" long:

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Another similar device:












































3006. 8" long:

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Answers:


3001. This tin cylinder from upstate New York contains numerous wires and was worn on the belt, they were used in a vineyard to tie the vines to direct growth and avoid too much growth in certain areas.




















3002. In the comments for this post someone supplied the answer for this device: "Unfortunately I recognize these from my brief time as a tanner - they're toggles used in stretching skins on a drying frame as part of the tanning process. Giant panels with a metal version of pegboard were hinged in the middle; folded down as a table, the toggles were pushed onto the edge of the soaking wet skins, then pulled back into the holes in the metal pegboard - two blokes working from opposite ends could stake out a skin for drying so that it was drum tight and not going to wrinkle.
This site has quite a few pics - the pegboards, a bin full of the toggles, etc."


























3003. These are feeders for livestock, when in use they are filled with hay:

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3004. This was attached to the rafters of a barn to hold the rail for a hay trolley:

























3005. Also no answer yet for these devices:

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3006. A mortise chisel:

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Are you interested in Old Tools and Tool Collecting? Want to learn more about tools, and meet some great people who have the same interests? Please take a minute to check out the Mid-West Tool Collectors Web Site at this link: www.mwtca.org.























To submit photos, send them to the address in my profile, please include dimensions, any text on the item, and where it was found.













Last week's set is seen below, click here to view the entire post.

Check out Neatorama for lots of funny T-shirts.







More discussion and comments on these photos can be found at the newsgroup rec.puzzles.

10 comments:

  1. 3003 are livestock feeders similar to these

    http://www.foxbros.ie/equipment/cattle-equipment/circular-feeders.html

    ReplyDelete
  2. 3006 looks like a mortising chisel to me.

    ReplyDelete
  3. 3004 - looks like a hanger of some sort, similar to hay carriage rail holders for the rafters of a barn. The various nail holes would be for position to the next hanger.

    ReplyDelete
  4. 3002 looks like a pice of climbing gear meant to keep tension on a rope while ascending.

    3005 - looks like a book press for the spine of a book. ~Frau

    ReplyDelete
  5. I like the information that you submit into this blog

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think 3002 is a lead vise similar to this one: http://www.delphiglass.com/lead-came-supplies/came-saws-tools/lead-vise

    ReplyDelete
  7. 3002: This looks like a vertical plate clamp. Possibly light duty, maybe for plywood and not steel?

    ReplyDelete
  8. 3002
    Unfortunately I recognize these from my brief time as a tanner - they're toggles used in stretching skins on a drying frame as part of the tanning process. Giant panels with a metal version of pegboard were hinged in the middle; folded down as a table, the toggles were pushed onto the edge of the soaking wet skins, then pulled back into the holes in the metal pegboard - two blokes working from opposite ends could stake out a skin for drying so that it was drum tight and not going to wrinkle.
    Seeing one of those toggles again brought back some rather odious memories of working in 40C+ heat, surrounded by rancid sheep fat, for minimum wage. I've never eaten sheep since, some 20 years later.

    This site has quite a few pics - the pegboards, a bin full of the toggles, etc:

    http://horween.com/101/technique-toggling-and-drying/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I'll pass your answer along to the owner of the tool.

      Delete